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Turkey develops renewable energy action plan with EBRD

CTBR Staff Writer Published 17 February 2015

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has supported Turkey in developing a renewable-energy action plan.

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The Government of Turkey is planning to develop 30% of its total installed capacity from renewable sources by 2023.

Plans include the addition of 34GW of hydropower, 20GW of wind energy, 5GW of solar energy, 1GW of geothermal and 1GW of biomass.

The country intends to meet 10% of its transport sector's requirements by renewable energy.

EBRD said that to achieve its goal, Turkey should increase its non-hydro renewables production about sevenfold in less than ten years.

The action plan sets out the measures to attract more investment in renewable energy projects.

Turkey Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Taner Yildiz, said: "Turkey will continue increasing energy generation from its domestic resources, including from renewable sources such as hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass."

"Renewable energy is one of the key elements of the policy and strategy which shape Turkey's energy agenda."

EBRD director for energy efficiency and climate change Terry McCallion said: "This action plan is a roadmap to a big change. The target is ambitious, but with determined and concerted efforts at all levels of government and with the full participation of the industry, Turkey will be able to unlock its green energy potential."

EBRD started operations in Turkey in 2009. The bank has invested about €5bn in the country through more than 140 projects in infrastructure, energy, agribusiness, industry and finance.

Image: The Government of Turkey is planning to develop 30% of its total installed capacity from renewable sources by 2023. Photo: Courtesy of European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.